Swan Coastal Plain

 
Gnangara pine plantation (c) KHoward WWF-Aus.JPG

The Northern Swan Coastal Plain KBA stretches from the city of Perth, north along the coast and extending inland. The Plain comprises of parks and reserves that protect highly valued habitats and vegetation and supports high levels of diversity of flora and fauna.

The Northern Swan Coastal Plain is also home to thousands of Western Australians. Residents of this KBA share their home with the largest remaining population of the Endangered Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo. Much of the native vegetation has historically been cleared to make way for the city of Perth, including the eucalypt forests and banksia woodlands that Carnaby’s rely on for food.

Carnabys -9905 Henry Cook.jpg

With the loss of native food sources, this intelligent parrot has supplemented its diet with seeds from large pine plantations. These plantations have now become the most important food source for the KBA’s population of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo. The largest of these plantations, Gnangara, now provides the most important roosting and feeding sites for Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos on the Swan Coastal Plain.

However, progressive clearing without replacement is causing alarming declines, and current urban development plans would see pine plantation loss dramatically accelerated. As the largest and most genetically diverse population, the future of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo is dependent upon safeguarding remaining habitat on the Northern Swan Coastal Plain.

Four in Flight - Carnaby's Black Cockatoo - Fitzgerald National Park WA - Geoff Hunter_.jpg

BirdLife Australia is calling on the Western Australian and Australian Governments to halt the clearing of critical Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo feeding habitat on the Swan Coastal Plain and to ensure no net loss of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo habitat in the broader Perth-Peel region.

 

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Photo credit: K Howard, Henry Cook & Geoff Hunter