Carnaby's Black Cockatoo

 

 
 
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Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo is just one of two species of white-tailed-black-cockatoos in the world. They are only found in the southwest of Western Australia. These charismatic birds can live up to 30 years in the wild. Males and females pair for life, often returning to the exact same tree hollows each year to raise young. They are one of Australia’s most loved backyard birds and are a familiar sight in and around Perth.

 

The Great Cocky Count has revealed a steady decline in Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo numbers. It’s estimated this population has nearly halved since 2010.

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The relentless expansion of Perth suburbs has removed bushland that has traditionally supported black-cockatoos and other native animals. Almost two thirds of Perth’s Carnaby’s now depend on the Gnangara Pine Plantation for food and shelter.

The former WA’s Government ‘Green Growth Plan’ proposes to significantly accelerate pine plantation clearance and by 2020, it will be all gone. This threatens the very survival of Perth’s charismatic Carnaby’s population by clearing their feeding and nesting habitats. The removal of pine plantations that support these birds would essentially starve the remaining population and result in a further 43 per cent decline in the Perth population of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos.

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To halt the decline, any development in the Perth and Peel Region must ensure protection of roost sites and feeding habitat. It is essential that native habitat is protected, and harvested pines replaced with feeding habitat of equivalent value.

BirdLife Australia looks forward to working with the new State Government to improve the plan to ensure no net loss of Carnaby's feeding habitat in the Perth-Peel region.

 

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Photo credit: Georgina Steytler, Henry Cook